curriculum

“In place of the parents” is not “the new parent”

 

“Teaching involves conflicting roles. Teachers want all children to succeed and to develop a love of learning, yet much of their time and energy goes into controlling students’ behaviour and evaluating students according to external standards. The more one tries to reach students individually, the more one may feel conflict with other aspects of schooling, such as the need to sort students by ability or the pressure to have students conform to rules and standards.” – Young, L., Levin, B., & Wallin, D. (2014). Understanding Canadian schools: An Introduction to Educational Administration (5th ed.).

 

Sadly the above paragraph is one of the main problems that both teachers and parents are struggling with. We want to give students independence and give them the skills to question the world around them, yet our arms are twisted behind our backs with (outdated) curriculum outcomes, budgeting issues, and more responsibilities than ever before. Many educators come into the field to make a difference and help their kids embrace learning… but if they want to keep their job they are required to teach to the test.

 

 

Canadians are more lucky than our American counterparts. The no child left behind policy has decimated their educational system, and they under perform when compared to the First World countries. Teachers go through years of University learning the tools on how to maximize learning for each individual student, and then we enter the classroom and get burdened with a literal mountain of work and lose sight of why we entered the field.

 

JFK’s famous line “ask not what your country can do for you, but what you an do for your country” applies here. When it comes to education, the teachers should not be receiving all these burdens from the get-go. The number one contributing factor to student performance has been parents involvement in their child’s education for decades now. Dozens of major studies have confirmed this. So really, ask not what your teacher can do for you, but what you can do for your teacher is a motto I’d personally prefer to have implanted in the minds of all students and parents.

 

Teacher’s who’ve recently graduated. What are your tips to current student-teachers who are about to enter the field?

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Student Teachers and New Teachers: Between a Rock and a Hard Place

The teaching profession seems to be in the middle of a vast series of changes that are shifting the very nature of our profession. The old teaching format: Meet the curriculum, give the students content, and prepare them for university with tests and papers. The new teaching format: Meet the students needs, give them skills for independent learning, prepare them for the real world. Both have pros and cons.

Personally I enjoy the new teaching format. The problem with the new format is that we have to throw it on top of the already established method. At the end of the day, we as educators need to meet the curriculum and give students a final grade, and often times, give a final exam. This makes it difficult to meet the requirements and show the benefits of the new method. The old format also appears to be more  time and curriculum friendly towards teachers. I say appears because many of us have difficulties giving the new format the required time and dedicated it requires to really show off the punch it packs.

Every teacher has different opinions on both of these methods and we as students are having to use both at the same time. This is leading to a lot of confusion and chaos for both the students, teachers, and student-teachers in the schools and universities. I feel that if we were sent five years back in time to be taught how to teach, it would be a lot more clear what we need to do (I would still prefer the new format of teaching however). Additionally I feel that if we were sent five years into the future, we would have a much better idea on what we need to do as educators as most school systems would have finally adapted. What are your thoughts on this?